GM Cricket Bat Grip Applicator Video Review

GM Cricket Bat Grip Applicator

This is a video i did quite  awhile ago but the product is still the same as is the process to put on the cricket bat grip. Watch and enjoy.

Please leave your comments, feedback or questions below.

To shop bat grips or this cricket bat grip applicator please follow the link below to :

Cricket Store Online

Ive knocked in my cricket bat but why did it still break?

Ive knocked in my cricket bat but why did it still break?

Jason from cricket store online takes another look at one of the most frequent cricket store question. Do i have to knock in my cricket bat? and how do i knock in a cricket bat?

For more cricket related questions please email me at : jason@cricketstoreonline.com

How to knock in and oil your new cricket bat. PART 2

 

PART 2. How to oil and knock in your new cricket bat. ( the laver and wood way )

 

So as you can see from the video i am talking about how you are going to be actually knocking in your bat using a Hardwood mallet. Its important not to hit the sides ( edges ) of the cricket bat and also not to hit the back or the bottom ( toe of the cricket bat that actually rests on the ground ) of the cricket bat.

 

Here is an excert from the Laver and wood websiteand discussed what ive mentioned in the above video…………

Knock in Face

After the oil has been applied, the knocking in process can begin. This should be done using a Hardwood bat mallet. This provides much better performance than a ball mallet and also speeds up the process.
Start by hitting the middle of the bat just hard enough to create a dent. [This is surprisingly hard]. Hold the bat up to the light to see if you are making a dent.

Knock in Toe

 

Gradually compress the face of the bat around these dents so that the face of the bat is level and you cannot see the initial dents any more. The bottom of the bat toe (the part that is in contact with the ground) should never be hit with the mallet.

Knock in edge

 

The edges require special attention. They need to be rounded off so that the hard new ball cannot damage them too much. The edges should be struck at 45 degrees to the face so that the mallet can compress the willow. Similar to the face make one dent on the edge, and then gradually even out the edge so that the whole surface has a smooth, rounded appearance. The back of the bat should never be touched with the mallet (or the ball).
If the bat is hit on the edge at 90 degrees to the face, it reduces the width of the bat and is making contact with an area that is not mechanically pressed. This increases the likelihood of cracking and you should not be hitting the ball flush on the edge in any case.
With a hardwood bat mallet the knocking in process should take between 10 and 15 sessions of about 10 minutes each (it is probably worth doing this for a bit longer if the bat is of different brand to ours).
Once you have completed this process take the bat into the nets and play a few shots with an old ball. If the bat is showing very deep seam marks then it needs more compressing. One will always get seam marks on the face of the bat; however they should not be too deep.

More information can be found on the Laver and wood website.http://www.laverwood.us/batcare.php

So thanks again for watching my videos and reading my blog. I hope you find it enjoyable and informative. I look forward to speaking to you soon.